Huckleberry Jam

Oh the joy of having a son who will pick huckleberries for you!  Having recently returned from living in Ukraine for over 2 years, he wasn’t about to let them go to waste.  Things are tough in Ukraine but they do know how to eat.  Fresh fruit and vegetables were grown by most everyone in his little village of Magazynka.  His picking yielded plenty for a batch of jam.

Huckleberry Jam

Lots of little grit can hide in huckleberries so it’s best to lay them out on a baking sheet and sort out the bad berries, sticks, leaves, etc.

Once you have cleaned the berries, wash under your sink sprayer.

Measure two quarts of berries.

Mash berries.

2 quarts of berries should mash into

about 4 cups crushed berries.

Measure into a bowl, 7 cups of sugar.  Use  good quality cane sugar, not cheap beet sugar.

In a heavy kettle or dutch oven, place berries and stir in sugar.

Mix thoroughly. You may add 1/2 teaspoon butter or coconut oil to reduce foaming.

Bring to a full, rolling boil over high heat, stirring constantly.

That means–it does NOT stop boiling when you stir.

Pour in one pouch of liquid pectin.  Return to boil and stir for one minute, exactly.

Ladle into clean jam jars.  It is nice to have warmed them by placing in hot water or directly out of a hot dishwasher!

Clean the rim of the jars with a clean cloth and screw on hot lids with bands.  (I like to have my lids simmering in water on the stove while I make the jam so they are ready when I need them.)

Briefly turn lidded jars upside down and back upright.  They will seal as they cool.  For longevity, you should hot water bath the jam.  We go through it so quickly, I don’t bother.

Refrigerate after opening the jar.

The bounty of nature.

~A

This post is part of “tempt my tummy Tuesday”

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4 Comments

Filed under Breakfast, Eating well, Gluten Free, Grain Free, Vegan

4 responses to “Huckleberry Jam

  1. Susan Gabel

    The color of these huckleberries are certainly not what we find in Idaho! Ours our purple! Where did you pick these interestingly red colored berries?

  2. gracefultable

    Red huckleberries are native in our yard in the Cascade mountain foothills. They are not as sweet or large as the purple/blue varieties. Thanks for posting!

  3. Karen

    What is your yield for this recipe? 4 pints? more? thx.

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